The weird and wonderful of Adelaide sewers

From an intact footy to the Caped Crusader’s costume, SA Water has revealed the five weirdest objects flushed into Adelaide sewers.

From an intact footy to the Caped Crusader’s costume, SA Water has revealed the five weirdest objects flushed into Adelaide sewers.

A pair of pants, false teeth and a traffic cone round out the list. The has been curated by plant operators at the utility’s Bolivar facility after taking stock of recent ‘unflushable’ hauls.

SA Water’s Senior Manager of Production and Treatment, Lisa Hannant, said the weird and wonderful objects provide a never-ending source of entertainment. They do come with plenty of nuisance for Adelaide sewers.

“Every year, we remove many items from our sewers that shouldn’t have been there in the first place. We’re constantly amazed by what people have tried to flush!” Hannant said.

“It was rather difficult to narrow it down to a ‘top five’ list. There are some truly ridiculous things Adelaideians put down the toilet.

“Perhaps the footy was a victim of this year’s Showdown. Perhaps the person was hoping to flush the loss from their mind.

“My personal favourite is the superhero costume. While their flushing habits are questionable, they could have seen the bat signal calling for help. They may have thought our sewer network was the quickest way to get where they were needed.

Adelaide sewers not a rubbish bin

“Larger, solid objects like this can easily block your private plumbing. They can also plug our sewer pipes when flushed, which poses a real risk of an internal overflow.

“What’s been flushed can come back up, and nobody wants their laundry, bathroom or kitchen to be awash with your number ones and twos.

“The solution is super simple. Only ever flush the three Ps – pee, poo and (toilet) paper – and in the costume and footy, they should have been placed in the general waste bin instead.

“I think trying to flush a traffic cone would be too audacious, so it’s more than likely someone managed to open one of our access covers on the road and pushed the cone into the sewers.

“Adelaideians might think what goes into the sewer is a case of ‘out of sight, out of mind’. However, I’ve seen some of the nastiest sewage overflows. Those sights may never leave my mind.

“We need to respect our sewers instead of treating them like rubbish bins, and they’ll look after us by helping protect public health.”

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